Last edited by Arami
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

4 edition of Crime in biological, social, and moral contexts found in the catalog.

Crime in biological, social, and moral contexts

  • 210 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by Praeger in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Criminal behavior.,
  • Human biology -- Social aspects.,
  • Sociobiology.,
  • Criminal behavior -- Genetic aspects.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

    Statementedited by Lee Ellis and Harry Hoffman ; foreword by Larry Siegal.
    ContributionsEllis, Lee, 1942-, Hoffman, Harry, 1953-
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHV6115 .C74 1990
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxvii, 326 p. :
    Number of Pages326
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL1871621M
    ISBN 100275930033
    LC Control Number90031184

    Purchase The Psychopathology of Crime - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBN , Social learning theory is a theory of learning process and social behavior which proposes that new behaviors can be acquired by observing and imitating others. It states that learning is a cognitive process that takes place in a social context and can occur purely through observation or direct instruction, even in the absence of motor reproduction or direct reinforcement.

    Social constructionism is a theory of knowledge in sociology and communication theory that examines the development of jointly-constructed understandings of the world that form the basis for shared assumptions about theory centers on the notion that meanings are developed in coordination with others rather than separately within each individual. Media and crime in the U.S. is critically discussed within a global context to engage students with global debates about the power of global media, as well as to help students better [SA: understand] the United States’ responses to criminal behavior. The latest theories and research on crime and media are included throughout.

    Crime is the most dangerous kind of “a social pathology” deviating from the norm, deviant behavior. Therefore, the main backbone elements of crime are personality traits of a potential criminal and the social conditions of life. Biological theory. The first attempts to explain the term “crime” were of a biological character.   Criminologist Believes Violent Behavior Is Biological In a new book, The Biological Roots of Crime, I was anti-social from the age of 9 to I .


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Crime in biological, social, and moral contexts Download PDF EPUB FB2

Crime in Biological, Social, and Moral Contexts: [Lee Ellis, Harry Hoffman] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Illustrating the diversity and richness of biosocial theory, this contributor volume introduces numerous new views on the biological and social causes of criminality and pro/antisociality.

From the biosocial perspectiveCited by: Illustrating the diversity and richness of biosocial theory, this contributor volume introduces numerous new views on and moral contexts book biological and social causes of criminality and pro/antisociality.

From the biosocial perspective, criminal behavior becomes part of a behavioral continuum which may theoretically include basic moral reasoning and altruism. The Hardcover of the Crime in Biological, Social, and Moral Contexts by Lee Ellis, Harry Hoffman | at Barnes & Noble. FREE Shipping on $35 or more.

Due to COVID, orders may be delayed. Get this from a library. Crime in biological, social, and moral contexts. [Lee Ellis; Harry Hoffman;]. Pris: kr. Inbunden, Skickas inom vardagar.

Köp Crime in Biological, Social, and Moral Contexts av Lee Ellis, Harry Hoffman på Crime in biological, social and moral contexts BOOKREVIEWS appears in the title of every chapter but the themes covered are more extensive than this.

The editors observe that there is a deart. Book Reviews: Crime In Biological, Social And Moral Contexts, edited by Lee Ellis and Harry Hoffman.

Praeger Publishers, pp. social Show all authors. BOOK REVIEWS: ELLIS AND HOFFMAN Crime in Biological, Social, and Moral Contexts edited by Lee Ellis and Harry Hoffman New York: Praeger,pp. US$ cloth. ISBN Greenwood Publish-ing Group, Inc., 88 Post Rd W, BoxWest-port, CTUSA. Pr?cis. The editors and contributors examine criminality.

The book should prove of interest to criminologists, psychologists, social scientists, and the persons involved in the psychiatric arena.' ' Social Forces "The editors, Ellis and Hoffman, deserve recognition for their courage and bravery in assembling this formidable volume on a most controversial subject.

Biological Theories of Crime. of a man. In order to be a criminal, it is necessary that the individual should face such personal, physical, and moral conditions and social environment which draw him towards crime.

The very notion of crime would be meaningless without a context of learning or social experience and of human interaction. Presenting a clear, comprehensive review of theoretical thinking on crime, this book encourages students to develop a deeper understanding of classic and contemporary theories and provides an interdisciplinary approach to criminology through the contributions of sociology, psychology and biology.

A key text for any undergraduate student following programmes in criminology and criminal justice. SAT argues that to understand how social factors (like social disadvantage) and developmental factors (such as cumulative experiences of disadvantage-related social conditions) influence people’s crime involvement as “causes of the causes” (i.e., causes of why people develop a high crime propensity and why settings develop weak law-relevant moral contexts), we need to.

©— Bioethics Research Library Box Washington DC Crime has high and diverse costs. The direct physical, material, mental, and emo-tional injury suffered by victims of crime is deplorable. Perhaps even more tragic, however, isthe indirect damage to society.

Attempts to control crime through the criminal justicesys-tem increasingly intrudeinour alfreedoms arethreatened as. 4. This book addresses brain biology from two perspectives: factors involved in the synchronizing of regions of the brain directly involved with moral decision making, and the influence of biological conditions that indirectly affect moral decision making.

Unlike most books of this ilk, the author demonstrates a concern for scientific ethics. s: relative to the substantial contribution this book makes to the sociology of law, the sociology of the professions, and perhaps the social movements literature. Crime in Biological, Social and Moral Contexts.

Edited by Lee Ellis and Harry Hoffnan. Praeger, pp. Cloth, $ Reviewer: LOU NARCEZ, Howard University. Criminology: Explaining Crime and Its Context, Seventh Edition, provides an introduction to crime and its underlying theories.

It also seeks to present evidence and stimulate critical thought on a range of criminological perspectives. The book is divided into three parts. The Functional Perspective: Social Structure Theories. Social structure theories all stress that crime results from the breakdown of society’s norms and social organization and in this sense fall under the functional perspective outlined in Chapter 1 “Understanding Social Problems”.They trace the roots of crime to problems in the society itself rather than to biological or psychological.

Notwithstanding the numerous controversies that have dogged the postulates of biological determinism, since the s there has been a growing trend to reinvigorate and legitimize studies that put biology and genetics at the forefront (Baker, Tuvblad, & Raine, ; Mednick, Moffitt, & Stack, ; Walsh & Beaver, ).Trying to move away from the pernicious implications of.

“In prevention we need to focus on developing policies that affect children and young people’s moral education and cognitive nurturing – which aids the development of greater self-control - and policies that help minimise the emergence of moral contexts conducive to crime” says Wikström.

“In this context, one of the most important. The evolution of collective counterstrategies to crime: From the primate control role to the criminal justice system.

In L. Ellis and H. Hoffman (eds) Crime in biological, social, and moral contexts, New York: Praeger. Google Scholar.Finally, the article advances the argument that fear of crime may be an individual response to community social order and a generalized attitude toward the moral trajectory of society.Most significant was Garofalo’s reformulation of classical notions of crime and his redefinition of crime as a violation of natural law, or a human universal.

A human universal is a trait, characteristic, or behavior that exists across cultures, regardless of the nuances of a given context. A famous example of a universal is the incest taboo.